Oral Surgery

  • By Website Team Technicians
  • 09 Dec, 2016

Q At a recent dental exam, my general dentist noticed an area on my gums which concerned him. He has recommended that I see an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for evaluation and possible treatment. Why?
A   Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are well trained in the identification and treatment of pathologies of the oral and perioral hard and soft tissues. After taking your history and a careful clinical exam, they can advise you on the need for further tests or observation or the need for a biopsy to determine the exact diagnosis and need for treatment of the lesion. Their training and expertise can provide evaluation, management and possible surgical care for all the pathologies which present in the oral cavity and perioral tissues.

Q Does the oral surgeon always use sutures when removing impacted wisdom teeth (3rd molars)?
A   The use of sutures depends on the type of tooth impaction. Sutures are used to hold the tissue in place until initial healing occurs (usually around 7 days). Most impacted teeth require some suturing. These sutures are commonly resorbable(dissolve in the mouth) and do not need removal in the office. Your oral surgeon will explain if sutures were used in the surgery, and how to manage them in the healing period.

Q I have osteoporosis and I take a bisphosphonate drug to help strengthen my bone structure. Recently I heard these drugs can interfere with bone healing in some people. Is that true?
A   Bisphosphonate drugs have been used intravenously to help cancer patients and orally for patients with osteoporosis. These drugs have improved the quality of life forpatients with metastatic cancer that involves the skeletal system. They have also been extremely effective in the prevention of bone fractures in patients with osteoporosis. Unfortunately,there have been reports of an increasing number of cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw. This condition is characterized by an area of nonhealing, exposed jaw bone which can lead to severe loss or destruction of the jaw bone. The majority of these cases have been related to the injectable form of bisphosphonate however there has been a small percentage related to the oral form. Most cases of osteonecrosis have been diagnosed after dental procedures such as tooth extraction however the condition can occur spontaneously. Patients who have been taking bisphosphonates and are considering elective dental surgery should speak with their prescribing medical specialist, family dentist, or oral and maxillofacial surgeon about the risks and benefits of continuing treatment.

Q My dentist recommended that I have my wisdom teeth extracted. Will I have to stay home from school?
A   Usually the postoperative course is influenced by the complexity of the extractions. In most situations the patient is advised to stay home for a couple of days following the removal of the wisdom teeth. This is due to the occurrence of post op discomfort and swelling which often tends to reach its peak within forty-eight to seventy-two hours after surgery. Ultimately the recuperative period will depend on the individual's ability to heal.

Q I lost a tooth sometime ago and now worry that I do not have enough bone to allow dental implant placement. Do I have options if bone is missing?
A   Your Oral Surgeon can advise you if there is sufficient bone to allow dental implant placement by examining you and reviewing your x-rays. Bone grafting is an option to make you an implant candidate. Various bone grafting materials can be used including your bone, bank bone, bovine bone mineral or other bioactive substance that promotes bone growth. Bone grafting for dental implants has become common and quite successful, enabling you to move ahead with dental implants versus conventional restorations such as a bridge.

Q I have been told that my jaws do not “match” one another affecting my bite and profile. What are my options for treatment?
A   Discrepancies between the upper and lower jaws can be significant and may require surgery in conjunction with orthodontic care. Such surgery is termed “orthognathic” and can be used to correct many skeletal(bony) abnormalities of the jaws. It is usually covered by medical insurance. A few examples include: retrusive or small lower jaw; protrusive or large lower jaw; gummy smile or long upper jaw. Crooked or asymmetric aws can also be fixed. See your oral surgeon and orthodontist to discuss proper diagnosis and treatment.

Q My child has a bump on their lower lip. It periodically swells, then "pops" and decreases in size. What is this?
A   A bump on the lips or within the oral cavity should be evaluated by your dentist. An area that swells periodically and then decreases in size is most typically a mucocele. It forms due to blockage of minor salivary glands. This creates a swelling filled with mucous from the gland. Treatment of a mucocele requires removal of the soft tissue enlargement and underlying minor salivary gland tissue. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon would evaluate the area and perform removal in their clinic.

Q My child was seen by his orthodontist and he recommended having teeth removed to facilitate his growth and dental development. Our general dentist referred us to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for their removal because my child is extremely fearful and apprehensive. Why?
A   You were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon because of their training and expertise in anesthesia and their ability to safely and comfortably manage the surgical experience for your child. As part of their residency, they have full training in anesthesia and can provide care from local anesthesia to conscious sedation and outpatient general anesthesia. All of these anesthesia modalities are provided in an office setting and will allow your child to have a safe and comfortable surgical experience without the need and cost of hospital care. There are many anesthesia options which you and your surgeon can discuss to provide an optimal experience for your child.

Q My child has a baby tooth that has been loose for some time but it hasn't come out yet. I can see the permanent tooth coming in behind it. Do I need to do anything?
A   You should see your dentist or paediatric dentist to evaluate your child's teeth if a loose tooth does not come out on its own or if the permanent teeth proceed to erupt when the primary teeth is still in place. They will examine the area and make radiographs. They may recommend removal of the primary tooth to facilitate the eruption of the permanent tooth in a timely fashion.

Q My seventeen year old daughter told me that she wants to get her tongue pierced. I don't feel comfortable with this. What do you suggest?
A   Common symptoms after oral piercing include pain, swelling, and occasionally infection. It may also induce a slight change in speech and periodically contribute to chipped or cracked teeth. The oral cavity is very vascular, especially the tongue. If a blood vessel is penetrated during the piercing severe bleeding can occur which may be difficult to control. As mentioned earlier, swelling of the tongue can be a common side effect. In extreme cases the swelling can become so severe that it can compromise the airway and prevent breathing. I would advise against it. She may think it's fashionable now but many young people are not aware of the potential complications that can occur.

Q I need to have a tooth removed and my dentist suggested a dental implant. What is a dental implant?
A   Dental implants are a titanium implant that is placed into the bone of the upper or lower jaw. It replaces the root of the missing tooth. The bone integrates, or heals directly to the surface of the implant, which gives it longevity. Once this healing has occurred, your dentist makes a crown, or tooth, to go on top of the implant.

Q What is an oral and maxillofacial surgeon?
A   An oral and maxillofacial surgeon has received extensive training and experience in the diagnosis and management of impacted teeth, misaligned jaws, and dental related infections of the head and neck. They also treat accident victims suffering facial injuries, perform jaw reconstruction with bone grafts, care for patients with tumors and cysts of the jaws, and provide dental implant surgery for patients who are missing teeth.
Another significant aspect of their training is the acquisition of knowledge and skill in advanced and complex pain control methods, including intravenous sedation and ambulatory general anesthesia. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon is able to provide quality care with maximum patient comfort and safety in the office setting.

Q Should my wisdom teeth be removed if they haven’t caused any problems yet?
A   Wisdom teeth, also known as third molars, are the last teeth to erupt in your mouth. Third molars however frequently become impacted due to a lack of space in the dental arch and their growth and eruption may be prevented by overlying gum, bone, or another tooth. Impacted third molars can be painful and lead to infection. However, not all problems related to third molars are painful or visible. These teeth may eventually crowd or damage adjacent teeth or roots. Sometimes they may even be associated with the growth of certain cysts or tumors. As wisdom teeth grow, their roots become longer and therefore more difficult to remove. This is why it is often recommended to remove impacted third molars when the roots are one-third to twothirds formed, usually between the ages of seventeen and twenty.

By Tonya Davis 27 Sep, 2017
Did you know that over 29% of adults are so scared of the dentist that they delay treatment and suffer from oral health problems? If you don't want your child to become part of the statistics, you need to give them the right messages about the dentist from the time they are young.

To ensure your little one doesn't develop a dental phobia, it's important to set a good example, portray dentist's visits as a positive thing and choose the right dentist. Read on for detailed advice on how to keep your child from getting scared at their next appointment.
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If you have recently noticed that your teeth are translucent to some degree, you may understandably be worried about what this indicates in regards to your oral health. Translucent teeth, however, are not always a sign that something is wrong. In fact, there are several reasons for this phenomenon, each of which will be explained below.
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When you think about losing teeth, you may picture a gap-toothed grin on a wide-eyed child who's talking about the tooth fairy. For children, tooth loss allows for the permanent teeth to erupt properly.

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By Tonya Davis 23 Jan, 2017
By Website Team Technicians 09 Dec, 2016

The time has come. You brush and floss your kids' teeth every day, but it's finally time for their first official dentist appointment. You know how important it is to attend regular dentist appointments. You want your kids to have good oral health for life and don't want them to develop a fear of the dentist or feel anxiety about dental visits.

To ensure your kids have a good experience on their foundational visit to the dentist, prepare them properly before the big day.

Schedule the First Visit Early

Most experts advise that children see a dentist sometime before their first birthday. The earlier you can get your kids in to the dentist, the better. If they start early, they'll be familiar with the process and know what to expect as they get older.

However, if you missed that first early visit, it's not too late to establish good oral health for your kids. Get them in to see a dentist as soon, and as young, as possible.

Go to a Family-Friendly Dentist

What kind of dentist you choose matters. Even if you love your own dentist, they may not be right for your kids.

Choose a dentist who regularly deals with children and families. Many dentists' offices have long experience dealing with children and will happily accept appointments for the whole family. Your kids will likely have a better time if their dentist knows how to appeal to children.

Remember it's not just the dentist who will deal with your kids. Everyone from the front-office staff to the oral hygienist will also interact with your children and contribute to their first dental experience. Choose an office that knows how to make a positive first impression.

Explain Why You Go to the Dentist

Before their first visit, explain to your kids why it's important to go to the dentist. Talk, in a kidfriendly way, about how the dentist uses special tools to make their teeth squeaky clean again.  

Use metaphors or imagery that are easy for kids to understand. Decide, based on your children's personalities, whether to tell them how little cavity bugs hide in their teeth and the dentist needs to clean them off, or whether to just say you need the dentist to keep teeth healthy and strong.

Tell your children what you personally like about going to the dentist. Maybe you like when the dentist polishes your teeth or takes an X-ray. Relay your own experience to give your kids a positive impression of what to expect.

Show Your Kids Positive Media

Familiarize your children with the environment and equipment they'll see at the dentist's office. Show them pictures and videos of kids at the dentist and images of the tools the dentist uses to clean their teeth. Find episodes of kid-friendly TV shows that address dental visits, and watch them with your children.

Expose your children to a variety of positive media about dental visits. If they know what things look like and what to expect before they get to the office, they'll be less intimidated by the dental environment.

Give Your Kids Something to Look Forward To

Offer your children a treat or special event for after their dentist visit. Maybe they'll get to spend a day at the zoo, or just go out for ice cream after their appointment. Give them a positive event to look forward to so they approach their first visit to the dentist with happy anticipation.

With the right preparation, you can help your kids establish a positive relationship to dentists and oral hygiene. Promote a good attitude before their first dental visit and build a healthy foundation for the rest of their lives.  

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